Mortgage Industry Springs into Action for Irma

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago hurricane harvey Hurricane Irma 2017-09-08 Brianna Gilpin Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Mortgage Industry Springs into Action for Irma Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Hurricane Irma, the biggest hurricane recorded in the Atlantic Basin, hit the Florida Keys Sunday morning leaving a path of destruction behind it.To combat storm damage, President Trump signed a $15.3 billion disaster relief package into law Friday that will suspend the U.S. borrowing limit and extend the National Flood Insurance Program through December 8, 2017.The House approved the package of bills Friday morning in a 316-90 vote in which The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Community Development Block Grant program will each receive $7.4 billion of the $15.3 billion. The remaining $450 million will support the Small Business Administration’s disaster loan program.The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and state bank regulators plan to assist financial institutions that are in the Irma affected areas. To help those institutions meet the financial services needs of their communities, they have provided guidelines for a number of services such as lending, investments, and temporary banking facilities.Additionally, Wells Fargo President and CEO Tim Sloan announced that the company is in the process of deploying Mobile Response Units to areas affected by Hurricane Harvey.“… Our thoughts are also with everyone now in the path of Hurricane Irma. Our teams on the ground and across the country are closely monitoring the new storm, and we will deliver the same payment, fee relief, and on-the-ground support to customers in impacted communities after Irma passes,” Sloan said.For those affected by Irma, Freddie Mac recommends to reach out to your mortgage company as soon as possible, register for disaster assistances at the federal (FEMA) and state levels, contact your insurance agents, and document to your home and belongings.To see details of the bill, including video coverage, click here.To see the guidelines for financial institutions, click here. Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: FSBO Sellers: Is it Worth it? Next: The People vs. Equifax September 8, 2017 1,761 Views Tagged with: hurricane harvey Hurricane Irma Home / Daily Dose / Mortgage Industry Springs into Action for Irma Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago About Author: Brianna Gilpin Brianna Gilpin, Online Editor for MReport and DS News, is a graduate of Texas A&M University where she received her B.A. in Telecommunication Media Studies. Gilpin previously worked at Hearst Media, one of the nation’s leading diversified media and information services companies. To contact Gilpin, email [email protected] Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

Scout Gaming to provide fantasy sports through UK licence

first_img Share Gambling.com maintains momentum against COVID-19 impacts August 19, 2020 12 operators holding existing agreements with Scout Gaming can now introduce its DFS services in the UK market after the company secured a licence to provide its fantasy sports solution.The Group’s CEO Andreas Ternström said that it had refused to shy away from the “toughening regulatory environment trend” by securing the B2B licence from the UK Gambling Commission.It is an extension to Scout’s B2C licence, which enables them to offer its products services to external brands operating in the UK market.Ternström commented: “We are delighted to have been awarded a B2B licence from the UKGC, allowing us to address yet another regulated market with great potential.“Scout is a recognized leader in B2B solutions for fantasy sports and pool betting. To date we have signed 12 licence agreements with operators, several of which have existing operations in the UK, where they now can introduce our services.”He added: “With a toughening regulatory environment trend ongoing, not only in the UK, operators need to look for new ways of acquiring players and broaden their target group.“We build games that speak to a different kind of audience, one that is generally more well educated and with higher levels of income. The skill aspect also attracts the younger generation who has grown up playing skill based games on their game consoles, computers and hand held devices.“The rare combination of skill game and gambling, mixed with high level of excitement makes our games particularly appealing to the savvy punters.”Scout Gaming Group has also shown its hand in the US by partnering with Metric Gaming to develop new products, although the future of DFS across the pond has been clouded somewhat by a judge in Albany ruling that it is a form of gambling and should be considered illegal in New York. Submit StumbleUpon Jason Ader – No Boogeyman… Activism will play a vital part in reshaping gambling August 20, 2020 Related Articles Successful summer leaves Leadstar positive over industry’s recovery August 18, 2020 Sharelast_img read more

Soybean planting date, rate and row width

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Planting date (both too early and too late) can reduce soybean yield potential.  In 2013 and 2014, we conducted a planting date trial at the Western Agricultural Research Station near South Charleston, Ohio.  In both years, soybean yield decreased by 0.6 bu/ac per day when planting after mid-May.  (Note: Soil temperatures were >50°F at each planting date.)  The greatest benefit of planting May 1 to mid-May is canopy closure which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture.Planting too early (before field conditions are adequate) comes with a risk.  Factors such as damping-off and pressure from bean leaf beetle are concerns to keep in mind, as well as the possibility of a late spring frost.  (Our early May planting date in northeastern Ohio in 2013 was damaged by bean leaf beetle and two frosts that occurred mid-May.)Before heading to the field, consider the conditions you will be planting into.  Soybean germination begins when soil temperatures reach 50°F and moisture is present at the planting depth of 1-1.5 inches.  With these conditions, emergence can typically be expected 2-3 weeks after planting.  Do not plant early if the soil is excessively cold or wet.  Slower germination and compaction can negate the benefits of the earlier planting date.  Timely planting is critical for maximizing yield in soybeans, but using good judgement on field conditions plays a role that is equally important to determining yield potential.Seeding rate.  What is the optimum soybean seeding rate?  On-farm research conducted by the AgCrops Team from 2004-2014 indicates that116,000 plants/acre at harvest resulted in a relative yield of 90% (i.e., If 100% yield is 50 bu/ac, 90% yield is 45 bu/ac) when soybeans were planted in May.  In the seeding rate figure, the relationship between yield and final stand is a relatively flat line indicating that soybean can yield well over a wide range of seeding rates.  (Note: All of the seeding rate work was conducted in either 15- or 7.5-inch row width.) Row spacing.  In Ohio, most soybeans are planted in row widths ≤ 15 inches.  Soybeans grown in narrow rows (≤ 15 inches) tend to out-yield soybean produced in wide row width (30 inches) due to increased sunlight interception in narrow rows.  Row width should be narrow enough for the soybean canopy to completely cover the interrow space by the time the soybeans begin to flower.In our 2016 row width study, soybeans grown in 7.5 and 15-inch rows yielded similarly while soybeans grown in 30-inch rows yielded on average 15-20% lower.  Our trial located at the Western Agricultural Research Station in Clark County was planted the end of May (pictured below).  In June, the soybeans planted in 30-inch rows looked better than the soybeans planted in 15 and 7.5-inch row widths.  However, the soybeans planted in 30-inch rows did not achieve canopy closure until after July 15.  The 30-inch plot pictured below yielded 59 bu/acre while the 15 and 7.5-inch plots pictured below yielded 81 and 85 bu/acre, respectively.  With funding from Ohio Soybean Council, this study will be repeated in 2016.last_img read more

Health meets recreation in a trend that sees gyms giving way to lifestyle centres

first_imgHigh on life: Dancing to Bollywood songs is the zingy way to reduce inchesFor a dank, sweaty place stacked randomly with treadmills, cross trainers and weights, the gym of the early 1990s was an unlikely hotspot for the emerging breed of the health-conscious yuppie.But with the craze showing scant signs,High on life: Dancing to Bollywood songs is the zingy way to reduce inchesFor a dank, sweaty place stacked randomly with treadmills, cross trainers and weights, the gym of the early 1990s was an unlikely hotspot for the emerging breed of the health-conscious yuppie.But with the craze showing scant signs of dying out, the health centres were forced into a facelift – sauna, massage and steam rooms. Even jacuzzis were crammed in to stretch the salubrious experience.It was an expansion that never stalled. In a transition that has edged out its predecessor much like an extinct species, today’s gym is embellished with a flurry of accoutrements designed to lure the laziest of gym rats. So after the workout, one can have a shampoo, blow dry or a hair cut, sip a decaf with wholegrain muffins in the cafe, chill out in the spa, get an oxygen hit, even buy a few paintings while leaving. Gym rat? More like a pampered poodle.Take Moksh in south Mumbai. A beauty salon, cafe, an exercise studio and a spa all rolled into one in 11,000 sq ft of space, it shies away from being the quintessential gym. It also offers pre-film screenings and displays affordable art by famous Indian painters for its members, besides ante-natal and post-natal exercise classes, salsa, Art of Living, yoga and jazz ballet. For those who want an energy boost, there is an oxygen bar.De-stress zone: Relaxing at Moksh in Mumbai can mean time spent at the oxygen bar as much as at yoga, salsa or jazz ballet classesThe new recreation-cum-fitness urge is making gym owners across the metros sit up and herald changes. In cities where distances limit recreation, it is becoming a fad among entrepreneurs to throw in that extra something to attract the fitness-conscious and the uninitiated.Says Swati Bhargava, sales and marketing team, Jay Wellness Centre (JWC) in Kailash Colony, Delhi: “These are no longer just gyms. They are lifestyle centres that address your needs round the clock, operating on flexi-time.” Which means you can walk in for a workout, a breakfast, even a visit to the doctor any time of the day.advertisementIt’s clearly an idea whose time has come. Darshana Gupta, 45, gets restless if she can’t squeeze in her workout every three days, but till only eight months ago, the housewife, unlike most fitness buffs, had not set foot inside a gym. Today, she’s dancing the salsa and shimmying to the latest Bollywood tracks in her Filmy Fit class in order to reduce. She is one of the 3,000 members at Exert, Mumbai, which houses a spa, a salon and a cafe, Injest, under the same roof.Says Anuradha Yusuf, proprietor of Exert: “There is a lot of spillover. Members like to indulge themselves after a workout with a spa package. They also spend time buying sports accessories from the pro shop as much as they enjoy sipping coffee in the cafe.” Gupta, who spends 10-15 hours a week at Exert, says, “I come to the gym to exercise to the Hindi film songs and practise my salsa moves.” She chose from a variety of speciality classes like kickboxing, tae bo, taekwando, kung fu, spinning and power punch on offer in her gym.Health drink: Coffee after a workout is a cool way to unwind at Inch by Inch, MumbaiIn Delhi, 26-year-old businessman Ravish Kapoor spends a good part of his mornings at the JWC, “a gym five minutes from my workplace”. So practically every weekday, Kapoor carries his work clothes and shaving kit to the gym for dressing up after the workout. “I have moved my bathroom in here,” he jests. The centre is conveniently equipped with a salon, sauna, jacuzzi, health cafe, even an underwater gym.The routine also gives him time to catch up with his “buddies” who are also members. To cater to surging desire to be fit more and more gyms and health centres are propping up. So, Inch by Inch – The Body Temple on Mumbai’s Marine Drive has a low-cal cafe with several extra services thrown in, while Qiuses Dynamix, an exercise studio, to offer classes ranging from kickboxing to taekwando. A swimming pool on its multilevel gym for aqua aerobics is the latest lure offered by Zaf in Mumbai, and 02 in Chennai, which started with a gym and a dance floor last year, now has two exercise and dance studios, a health bar and a gallery for art shows.The mushrooming of fitness centres has given rise to a new trend – gym hopping. For Mumbaikar Zarina Mittal, 31, who has changed three gyms in the past nine months, being seen at the latest fitness destination is also an ego massage. “The gym you go to is a style statement. So at Moksh, I am not just exercising but also gossiping, going on shopping sprees, partying at the in-house restaurant and going out with friends formed here.”advertisementSuch luxury does not come cheap. The annual membership at Moksh varies from Rs 30,000 to Rs 60,000 depending on peak/non-peak hours, with free sessions at the oxygen bar and discounts thrown in. The rates are similar at the JWC, and membership includes yoga, aerobics, aqua aerobics classes and “recreational events”. But as Kapoor says, it helps relieve stress and more important, it’s fun. Which seems to be the latest credo fitness centres are living by.-with Methil Renuka in Delhi and Arun Ram in Chennailast_img read more

By Jeff Clark BIG GOLD

first_imgBy Jeff Clark, BIG GOLD (Click on image to enlarge) The largest end-user of solar panels is Germany, though that’s changing. Last year Germany accounted for 27.3% of global installations, but due to subsidy cuts, solar-panel installation capacity dropped from 7.7 gigawatts to 7.5. In the big picture, that decline was offset by increases in China, France, Italy, the UK, Japan, and the US. In their 2012 Yearbook, CPM projected a slight decline in silver demand from solar panels due to a reduction of new installation in Europe and oversupply from excess production in China. But with the initiative from Japan, that estimate is almost certainly low. Japan Gives New Life to PV Industry After the Fukushima disaster, Japanese authorities wanted to cut the nation’s dependence on nuclear energy. Approximately 30% of Japan’s power was generated by nuclear before the catastrophe; now the focus has shifted to other green energy alternatives, including solar. The new tariffs might work. The suggested rate of 42 JPY ($0.53) per kilowatt hour (expected to be maintained for 20 years) is more than twice the rate in Germany (€0.17 – or $0.246).Bloomberg estimates that this generous increase will create $9.6 billion investments in Japan alone. Here’s what that amount of money would do to the sector: There were approximately1.3 gigawatts of solar capacity installed in 2011, but experts anticipate that number to nearly double to 2.3-2.5GW for 2012, and hit 3.0GW in 2013. According to SolarBuzz, Japan could see 28GW of solar capacity installed by 2020 and 50GW by 2030. That’s a lot of solar panels, and – even assuming improved efficiency – it’ll take a lot of silver. Price Factors During recent years, solar panels have become significantly less expensive and more end-user friendly. However, the fact that each panel contains a lot of silver can make it susceptible to large price fluctuations. If the silver price gets too high, manufacturers might seek alternatives, of course, but they can’t easily eliminate use of the metal. And if the product gets too expensive, demand could fall. Companies are already looking for ways to reduce the amount of silver used in PV panels or to replace it with another element. At the moment there are two main solar panel technologies on the market. The traditional one is “thick film,” where silver is the main component. The other one is a less-expensive “thin-film” method which replaces silver with another material, cadmium telluride. The development of thin-film solar panels has picked up due to its lower price, but the technology is less effective. Thick film is more efficient in gathering energy from the sun, and this type of panel still prevails on the market. CPM reports that it accounted for roughly 91% of total installations last year, and analysts expect thick-film panels to maintain their dominance for at least the next several years. Further, both panel types use silver outside of the cell for reflectivity and other functions, so the odds of silver being eliminated from solar panels entirely are very low at this time. For investors, this means that at least in the near term, the solar industry will continue to use silver-intensive technology, thus supporting growing industrial demand for the metal. But that’s not all, folks… New Era for Silver Usage For a long time, silver industrial demand was dependent almost entirely on one industry: photography. Silver-based camera film dramatically changed the structure of silver demand at the beginning of the 20th century. By that time, silver had primarily been used in silverware, jewelry, and as money. At its peak, photographic demand accounted for about 50% of the market. But this is the 21st century, and in spite of substantial declines in film use, the modern world has developed many other important uses from silver’s unique properties. Probably the most important shift is that industrial demand for silver no longer comes from a single field, but from numerous applications – almost too many to count – virtually none of which show any signs of slowing. This fact makes the forecast for silver demand more positive and stable; when one industry drops, others may offset the decline. Here’s a smattering of uses, many of which are still in their infancy: Solid-state lighting (SSL), which uses semiconductors to produce light with either light-emitting diodes (LED) or organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), rather than the more traditional electrical filaments. SSL is used in traffic lights and some car headlamps. Radio frequency identification (RFID) uses printed silver ink made from silver nitrate. RFID chips have become so ubiquitous, it’s hard to find any new product that doesn’t have at least one – even if that’s only in the security tag affixed to the package. Supercapacitors and superconductors, autocatalysts and new types of more effective batteries. Medical applications like aseptic coverings for surgery, traumatic wounds, antibacterial bandages and fabrics, dental amalgam, and silver salts that help prevent infections in newborns. It’s also used as a cure for dermatological problems and certain types of cancer. Water purification systems, washing machines, air conditioners, and refrigeration. NASA used silver to sterilize recycled water aboard the space shuttle. Food packaging and preservation. Manufacturers of commercial ice machines are using silver-embedded hoses, clamps, pipe fittings, and other places where gunk can build up and harbor bacteria. Meat processors use silver-embedded tables, grinders, tools, and hooks. Silver is used to keep fruit, vegetables, and cut flowers fresh while in transit. Public hygiene, such as antimicrobial protection of telephone receivers, door handles, bed rails, toilet seats, counter tops, children’s toys, socks, underwear, bed linen, towels, etc. Other wide-ranging consumer products used every day: makeup, antibacterial soaps and kitchenware, hand and air sanitizers, and facial creams and masks. Though the total contribution from these new silver uses is relatively modest, the Silver Institute rather dryly forecasts that “there is a potential for a number of these segments to boost their silver consumption.” As you can see in the chart below, its forecast for silver demand for new industrial uses projects that the biggest increases will be in batteries, SSL, and RFID. In early July, Japan set a premium price for solar energy that was three times the rate of conventional power. This meant utility companies would be paid three times more for electricity sourced from solar. It’s widely expected that the premium will ignite the use of solar power – and solar uses a lot of silver. Silver Demand from PV Panels As you may know, silver is used in photovoltaic (PV) technology to generate solar power. A typical solar panel uses a fair amount of the metal – roughly two-thirds of an ounce (20 grams). To put that in perspective, a cellphone contains around 200 to 300 milligrams (a milligram weighs about as much as a grain of sand). A laptop contains 750 milligrams to 1.25 grams. Photovoltaic technology is relatively young, but each year its use is growing rapidly. Just since 2000, the amount of silver consumed by solar-panel makers has risen an average of 50% per year. Demand grew from one million ounces in 2002 to 60 million ounces in 2011. Last year demand from the PV industry represented almost 11% of total industrial demand for the metal (excluding jewelry). According to statistics from CPM Group, demand grew by 11.2 million ounces, the strongest volume growth of all major sources (jewelry and electronics). And this was before the Japanese announcement was made. The primary uses for silver are growing, too. For example, the automobile industry is increasing consumption, due to both increases in the number of vehicles manufactured and the expanded use of electrical contacts. As the number of improvements in vehicles increase, so does the amount of silver used. For example, silver is used to control seat and mirror adjustments, windshield wipers, and manage navigation systems. Based on their research, the Silver Institute forecasts that industrial usage will rise to 665.9 million troy ounces by 2015 and account for more than 60% of total fabrication demand. What It Means for Investors Since half of silver demand is for industrial purposes, it can act like an industrial metal in addition to its precious metal component. This means it’s susceptible to more forces than gold, making it more volatile as well as more difficult to predict its future price. Conclusions: The solar industry has great potential to become one of the more important sources of silver demand. This will lend strong support to prices. This industry had zero impact on silver ten years ago; it now represents 10% of total industrial demand. And it’s not just Japan. According to a news report, 102 countries are now installing solar panels – from just 18 two years ago. Heavy and/or growing usage is reported in Germany, Italy, Japan, France, Belgium, Portugal, Spain, US, Australia, and Asia, including China and India. It appears that the development of the solar industry didn’t occur as a result of natural forces, since to a large degree it was initiated by government subsidies that supported the industry (and indirectly the silver price). You may like or not like these market interventions, but as investors, it’s important to recognize these trends regardless of whether we agree with them. It’s particularly important to keep an eye on these subsidies, as they could vanish if cash-strapped governments change their priorities. That won’t happen overnight, however, so we should have ample warning. Due to its unique properties, the number of applications for silver continues to grow. Researchers at the Silver Institute are upbeat about the future for silver industrial demand. That’s no surprise, but it doesn’t make them wrong; the implication here is that only the worst type of economy would have a negative impact on demand. If demand grows fast enough, it could impact not only the price but the availability of the metal, in spite of rising mine production. If that happens, bullion purchase premiums will rise as supply becomes tighter. The bottom line on the above is that the growing number of industrial applications for silver represents a long-term shift in this market. Increasingly diverse usage is not only here to stay but will continue to grow, supporting the price and impacting the balance of supply and demand. For investors, the thing to keep in mind is that while long-term prospects for silver prices are extremely bullish, to the degree prices are driven by this increased industrial demand, they are vulnerable to economic correction/contraction in the short term. Invest accordingly. With all it has going for it, silver offers investors some of today’s best profit opportunities.  But buying bullion isn’t the best way to play silver’s resurgence.  Here’s a far better strategy…last_img read more

On a rare rainy night in Albuquerque two dozen st

first_imgOn a rare rainy night in Albuquerque, two dozen students are learning the proper way to care for older people. Teacher Liliana Reyes is reviewing the systems of the body — circulatory, respiratory and so on — to prepare them for an upcoming exam.These students are seeking to join a workforce of about 3 million people who help older adults remain in their homes. They assist these clients with things like bathing, dressing, and taking medication on time.About a quarter of these workers are immigrants. But as Congress and the White House consider changes to immigration policy, some people in the home care industry worry that there won’t be enough people to care for the nation’s growing number of elders.What makes the Albuquerque class unusual is that it’s taught entirely in Spanish. All of the students are immigrants, mostly from Mexico. The course is a joint project of Central New Mexico Community College and a community education center for immigrants called Encuentro. Everyone who passes the course becomes a state-certified home health aide.But some of these students already care for older adults, even though they’ve lacked training. Zoila Gutierrez says the first job she had in this field paid $6 an hour for a shift that lasted from 7 at night to 7 in the morning.”This course is going to open a lot of doors for me in terms of being able to get better work,” she says. “But most importantly, I want to know about all the rules that I must follow to provide good care.”Gutierrez has a complicated life. She’s 42 years old and came to Albuquerque from Mexico in 2004. She doesn’t have papers. Her youngest child is a citizen. Her two older kids are both registered under DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy. So, at the same time she’s studying to improve her prospects in the United States, she and her children also discuss the possibility of going back to Mexico.”We must have a Plan B,” she says. “We don’t want to give up our dreams, but we must think in the ‘What if?’ So, no, we don’t want to leave. But it’s an option.”While Gutierrez worries about the Trump administration’s crackdown on illegal immigration, others working in home care worry about the administration’s proposals for restricting legal immigrants.President Trump wants to focus on highly skilled, well-educated workers. But the policy change that would hurt the home care industry the most would be limiting family reunification, sometimes called chain migration. That’s according to Robyn Stone, senior vice president for research at Leading Age, which represents the nonprofit side of long-term care.”This immigrant population primarily came to the United States through family reunification,” says Stone. “If we shift in our policy [on] immigration, the pipeline for this workforce could be substantially affected.”That’s not just a theoretical concern for Sherwin Sheik. He’s the founder and CEO of a company called CARELINX, which he describes as a cross between Uber and Match.com for connecting home care workers with clients.”It takes a very special person to want to do these jobs,” Sheik says. “They tend to be immigrants. If we have tighter policies, it’s going to impact the industry, without a doubt.”The nation’s rapidly aging population has made personal care assistants and home health aides (who have more specialized training around health issues) the fastest growing low-skilled occupations in the U.S.But Steven Camerota isn’t worried about a shortage in home care workers. He’s the director of research at the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates for restrictions on immigration. He points out that, despite the growing immigrant workforce, three-quarters of the people currently providing home care were born in the U.S.There’s no mystery to what it would take to increase that percentage, says Camerota. “Raise wages. Treat workers better.”Home care workers sometimes make as little as $10 an hour. At the same time, he says, “we have an enormous supply of less-educated [American citizens] currently not working who could easily fill these jobs if employers treat them reasonably well.”But this work isn’t just a matter of money for Zoila Guttierrez. She finds meaning in taking care of older people.”I like to care for them and make sure they’re doing well — that they’re OK,” she says.It will take at least a million more people who feel the same way to meet the needs of older adults over the next decade, whether those workers are immigrants or American-born. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more